Is CRM Software Essential to your Business?

The right technology investment can lead to business success. With customer relationship management (CRM) software at the helm of your sales and marketing efforts, you can nurture long-lasting business relationships and improve your bottom line. If you need more convincing, we’ve compiled five more reasons why your business needs CRM.

Grows with your business

The ol’ Rolodex may have been useful for managing a few clients, but you’ll need a much better solution if you plan to maintain relationships with hundreds, possibly thousands, more. CRM scales with your business, meaning it can handle larger data sets and more clients as you expand your sales operation.

Organizes your data

CRM software acts as a central database for all your sales records and transactions. This means important customer information can be retrieved in just a few clicks rather than by rifling through thousands of documents, sticky notes, and disorganized cabinets. And since CRM is hosted in the cloud, sales data, customer interactions, and other actionable information are available for the entire company.

Improves customer service

Your sales team could be the most persuasive individuals in the world, but this means nothing if they can’t recall anything about their clients and their preferences. When your sales staff follows up on leads or existing customers, CRM will automatically retrieve contact history, past purchases, and customer preferences from your client database and display them on a single page during the call.

Armed with detailed customer information, sales representatives will be able to recommend products and services that meet the client’s needs. So instead of struggling through a sales call, marketing employees can focus on delivering a professional sales pitch.

Streamlines your sales funnel

CRM comes equipped with workflow management functions, supporting your sales pipeline in a number of ways. For example, you can configure your CRM to send instant follow-up emails when a lead visits a particular product page. You can even use automation to track where certain leads are in the sales pipeline and delegate the task to one of your sales closers.

Analyzes sales data

With real-time sales information, business managers can track marketing campaigns and adjust their strategy accordingly. For instance, you might notice that click-through-rates for promotional emails and company newsletters are higher during Tuesday afternoon than Friday night. Having this information can help you focus your marketing efforts and message to generate more leads.

In addition, you can use CRM to analyze customer calling activity, market demographics, lead conversion rates, and key performance indicators to influence future business decisions.

Understanding your customers can put you several steps ahead of the competition. If you need to manage contacts, eliminate time-consuming procedures, and improve your sales performance, CRM is the perfect business solution.

Contact us today to find out whether CRM is the right fit for your business.

 

What is App Virtualization?

Small- or medium-sized business (SMB) owners may be overwhelmed by their company’s IT demands. Fortunately, virtualization services are giving them a fighting chance to stay on top. Some technology vendors even recommend app virtualization services because many SMBs use it. Learn if it’s right for you by understanding the basics.

What are non-virtualized apps?

To understand app virtualization, first you need to understand how non-virtualized apps are installed.

When you install an application like Skype or Slack onto a computer, the installer program puts most of the files required for the app to run on your hard drive’s Program Files folder. This process is usually fine for personal use but may become problematic if you install similar apps on your device.

For instance, if two similar apps are installed on the same file destination, there’s a chance that they might conflict with each other and inevitably crash. Likewise, if you uninstall a program without knowing that it shares important files with another application, you run the risk of breaking the other one.

The solution to this is app virtualization.

What is app virtualization?

App virtualization involves running a program in an environment separate from the physical server, allowing you to run programs that are normally incompatible with a certain operating system (OS). In other words, virtualized apps trick your computer into working as if the application is running on a local machine, but in fact, you’re actually accessing the app from somewhere else.

Advantages of app virtualization

App virtualization offers numerous advantages for SMBs, including:

  • Quick installation times and less money spent on local installation
  • Allowing incompatible applications to run on any local machine. For instance, if your laptop is dated and can’t run the latest apps on its own, you can lighten the load on your CPU by accessing virtualized apps instead.
  • Mac users can run any Windows apps if your company’s local server runs Windows OS.
  • Applications on your computers won’t be in conflict with each other since virtual apps are installed in a separate location.
  • Upgrading is easy because your IT team won’t have to upgrade applications in individual desktops, they just have to upgrade the virtual application within the company’s local server.
  • Applications can be accessed from any machine, allowing your employees to work from home or on the go if they choose to.

Things to consider

Before you start deploying app virtualization solutions, you need to have a stable network connection so users can smoothly stream apps. Note that some apps like antivirus programs are difficult to virtualize since they need to be closely integrated with your local OS.

Virtualizing a workplace is no easy task, and that’s where we come in. If you’re convinced that your company can benefit from app virtualization, get in touch with our IT experts today.

Be Aware of these 4 Types of Hackers

Hackers come in all shapes and sizes. From kids wanting to gain notoriety on the internet to political groups trying to send a message, the motives for a cyberattack vary widely. So how can you protect yourself? It all starts with getting to know your enemy a little better. Here’s a profile of four different types of hackers.

Script Kiddies

Skill-wise, script kiddies (or skids, for short) are at the bottom of the hacker totem pole. Their name comes from the fact that they use scripts or other automated tools written by others. Most of the time, script kiddies are young people on a quest for internet notoriety. Or, more often than not, they’re simply bored and in search of a thrill. Many never become full-time hackers; in fact, many script kiddies end up using their skills for the greater good, working in the security industry.

Though lacking in hacking know-how, script kiddies shouldn’t be dismissed so easily, as they can cause businesses much damage. In May 2000, for instance, a couple of skids sent out an email with the subject line “ILOVEYOU” and ended up causing a reported $10 billion in lost productivity and digital damage.

Hacktivists

Hacktivists are primarily politically motivated, and they often hack into businesses and government systems to promote a particular political agenda or to effect social change. These so-called “hackers with a cause” steal confidential information to expose or simply disrupt their target’s operations.

If you’re a small- or medium-sized (SMB) owner, don’t think for a second that you’re immune to hacktivist attacks. This is especially true if your company is associated or partnered with organizations that are prime hacktivist targets. Or, if your business provides services that can be seen as unethical, you may targeted by hacktivists as well.

Cybercriminals

When a hacker breaks into digital systems or networks with malicious intent, they are considered a cybercriminal. Cybercriminals target everyone from individuals to SMBs to large enterprises and banks that either have a very valuable resource to steal or security that is easy to exploit, or a combination of both.

They can attack in a number of ways, including using social engineering to trick users into volunteering sensitive personal or company data, which they can then sell in underground markets in the dark web. They can also infect computers with ransomware and other malware, or use digital technology to carry out “conventional crimes” like fraud and illegal gambling.

Insiders

Perhaps the scariest type of hacker is the one that lurks within your own organization. An insider can be anyone from current and former employees to contractors to business associates. Oftentimes their mission is payback: to right a wrong they believe a company has done them, they’ll steal sensitive documents or try to disrupt the organization somehow. Edward Snowden is a prime example of an insider who hacked his own organization — the US government.

Now that you know what motivates your enemy, and you think you might be a target, it’s time to secure your business from the different types of hackers out there. Get in touch with our experts today to learn how.

Forget These Disaster Recovery Myths

Disaster recovery (DR) isn’t what it used to be. Long gone are the days when a DR solution cost over a hundred thousand dollars and relied predominantly on tape backups. Cloud computing has dramatically changed the DR landscape. Unfortunately, there are still many misconceptions about DR. Here are a few of the myths that no longer apply.

Tape Backups are the Best DR Solution
Backup tapes are physical objects that deteriorate over time. Don’t believe us? Try listening to a cassette tape from the ‘90s. Over time, tape backups become distorted and stop working. Deterioration is slow and may only affect some files in the early stages, so don’t settle for a mere cursory check. Tape backups are not the best for DR solutions, but they are an excellent price for offline storage. Super DLT Tape II can store up to 600GB of data and has a shelf life of 30 years if stored in the right environment; much longer than any backup medium.

Aside from backups in your office, another set of tape backups needs to be stored outside your premises. In case a natural disaster damages your office, not all your data will be wiped out. But if your storage space isn’t safe from the elements, this could also be a problem.

BUT,  a cloud backup solution is a much better DR solution.  The backups are always available,  online and ready when you need them for the disaster.  The right DR solution can get you back online in minutes, while the tape backups take much longer to restore data.   A Tape backup is not a good DR solution. Unlike tape backups, a cloud-based backup saves you time. Data is automatically backed up online, and you don’t need to spend time managing boxes of tapes. Your time is better spent on your assigned tasks, not IT management.

The RTO you want will be too expensive
Recovery time objectives (RTO) are essential to any DR plan. You need to get everything up and running again as quickly as possible to avoid serious losses. In the days before the cloud, a swift recovery time could cost you well into six figures. Today, cloud and virtualization solutions have made this much more affordable, and faster than ever before.

Most DR providers can back up your critical data in an hour or two. And if you ever need to recover it, most services can do so in less than a day. That’s the power of the cloud. And when it comes to DR, it truly has changed everything.

Disaster recovery is for big business, not SMBs
The cloud has made this valuable service affordable for businesses of all sizes. From dental offices to small retail operations, SMBs can now take advantage of the best DR solutions on the market. Advances in IT and the cloud have eliminated the obstacles of complexity, costs, and insufficient IT resources.

We hope that by dispelling these myths, we’ve demonstrated to you that disaster recovery is more affordable and efficient than ever. If you’d like to learn how our DR solutions can safeguard your business, send us a message at info@wamsinc.com or call us at 800-421-7151 and we’ll gladly fill you in.

Which Business Computers are Best?

We know that IT plays a big role in reaching your small- and medium-sized business (SMB) milestones. When it comes to hardware, you don’t need to be an IT expert to find the best possible solution. Here’s a concise and helpful guide to the best hardware for your firm.

Portability

Laptops allow you to keep working when you don’t have an electrical outlet. However, this ability to take your work anywhere can be counterproductive by creating more stress on employees who think they must work all the time.

Memory/Speed

Desktop computers used to have more memory and faster processors than laptops. And although high-powered laptops have caught up, they are more expensive. If work is limited to word processing and emailing, affordable less-powerful laptops should be enough. Anything more will probably require a desktop machine.

We also recommend SSD hard drives to increase speed. These offer a huge increase in performance and should be considered for desktops and laptops.  Most modern laptops will come with a SSD, but they do cost a bit more.

Security

Data security is necessary not only against data leaks but as protection from litigation, reputation damage, and loss of business. With a network security system and IT staff, vulnerabilities are easier to address for desktop computers within office premises. They’re also less likely to be stolen.

For laptops, however, mobility makes them more vulnerable. Data loss is a real risk as laptops may be connected to unsecured networks and hotspots or be lost or stolen. You should consider hard drive encryption.  This way if the laptop is stolen the thief won’t be able to access anything on the laptop without the encryption password. Given the fact that they are so much smaller and more portable, keep in mind that laptops are also much easier to steal. NEVER and we mean NEVER leave your laptop in your car. Protecting your laptops require special safeguards, and consequently more time and money.

Price

Laptops and desktops come in varying prices according to preferences. On the cheaper end of the price range spectrum, there are notebook-style laptops that are limited to word processing and web browsing capabilities. Desktops have affordable equivalents as well. The deciding factor when it comes to price is your IT service provider or hardware supplier. With the right partner, you should be able to get a good bulk deal on powerful but affordable desktops or laptops.

Longevity

Laptop computers may provide the convenience of mobility, but it’s much harder to upgrade their components as they get older. Laptops are also easier to drop or damage and more expensive to replace or repair. Being in a fixed location, desktops are less prone to this. And unlike laptops, many desktops are not always pre-assembled. Many desktops can be custom built with parts that are easily removed, replaced, or upgraded. You should also consider hard drive encryption.  This way if the laptop is stolen the thief won’t be able to access anything on the laptop without the encryption password.

Final Recommendation

A growing company really needs a combination of both types of computers. However, a desktop computer will be generally more reliable for the fledgling company owner. Laptops should be added as budget permits to provide that extra portability and convenience, especially for managers who work remotely.

If you have other questions regarding enterprise hardware, give us a call at 800-421-7151. We’d be happy to recommend the best solution according to your company’s business needs and objectives.

4 Social Engineering Scams to Watch Out For

Experts are constantly creating new security systems to protect individuals and businesses from hackers. From those who want to attend popular events like the Olympics to avoiding an angry boss, hackers are preying on gullible victims to circumvent network security systems and steal sensitive information. If you don’t want to be the next victim, read about the most common social engineering scams here.

Phishing

This is the most frequently used social engineering attack, especially against small businesses. Check out these frightening statistics:

How is phishing carried out? Criminals make use of emails, phone calls, or text messages to steal money. Victims are directed to phony websites or hotlines and are tricked into giving away sensitive information like names, addresses, login information, social security, and credit card numbers.

To protect yourself, be wary of emails from people you don’t know that offer you a prize, come with attachments you didn’t request, direct you to suspicious sites, or urge you to act quickly. Phishing emails usually appear to come from reliable sources, but they are wolves in sheep’s clothing.

One of the most infamous and widespread examples of phishing was during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio, where victims received fraudulent emails for fake ticketing services that stole their personal and financial information.

Be aware of Whaling as well. Whaling and Phishing are both very similar:

Phishing is more automated, hoping you go to their fake website and type a real username/password so they can access your data.

Whaling is the same thing, but a real person is behind the email making it look legitimate and harder for filters to block it. They often ask for bank transfers or something similar. They will also respond quickly if you respond to the email to start a conversation and suck you in.

Tailgating

What’s the fastest and easiest way for criminals to enter a secure office? Through the front door, of course! Tailgating happens when an employee holds the door open for strangers and unauthorized visitors, allowing them to infiltrate an organization. This simple act of kindness enables fraudsters to enter restricted areas, access computers when no one is looking, or leave behind devices for snooping.

Quid pro quo

Here, scam artists offer a free service or a prize in exchange for information. They may lure their victims with a gift, concert tickets, a T-shirt, or early access to a popular game in exchange for login credentials, account details, passwords, and other important information. Or hackers may volunteer to fix their victims’ IT problems to get what they want. In most cases, the gift is a cheap trinket or the tickets are fake, but damages from stolen information are all too real.

Pretexting

Fraudsters pretend to be someone else to steal information. They may pose as a telemarketer, tech support representative, co-worker, or police officer to fish out credit card information, bank account details, usernames, and passwords. The con artist may even convince the unsuspecting victim to apply for a loan over the phone to get more details from the victim. By gaining the person’s trust, the scammer can fool anyone into divulging company secrets.

Also, and we cannot emphasize this enough, be aware of shoulder surfing. Shoulder surfing happens when someone is standing over your shoulder and watching the keystrokes that you enter while typing your password. Often this happens fairly quickly, and you may not even notice it. We all know that if someone obtains your password, they have access to your entire online life; keep an eye out for people nearby when typing in your passwords.

In spite of the many security measures available today, fraudsters and their social engineering schemes continue to haunt and harm many businesses. Thus, it’s best to prepare for the worst. To protect sensitive information, educate yourself and be careful. Remember: If anything is too good to be true, it probably is!

To shield your business from social engineering attacks, don’t take chances! Get in touch with us today by calling 800-421-7151.